November 2016 Elections: HD 22 and 25

///November 2016 Elections: HD 22 and 25

November 2016 Elections: HD 22 and 25

 – Scroll down for House District 25 candidate answers –

State Representative, House District 22

Teresa Alonso Leon: electalonsoleon.com

1. What racial/cultural/ethnic identities do you claim?

Leon – Latina, Purépecha (Indigenous Mexican)

2. There are over 800,000 People of Color in Oregon, and growing.  Generations of racial exclusion, exploitation and divestment have historically marginalized communities of color from the political process.  What steps will you take to engage communities of color?

Leon – In HD 22, the only majority-minority district in Oregon, I can see that so many of our people of color feel disengaged from state government. When I am elected I will be the first person of color to represent this area. I am already taking active steps to engage diverse  communities, in my work as a councilor, and in my campaign with trilingual campaign materials and a focus on outreach to every part of our community, and want to continue that style of inclusive outreach when I am in office.

3. What are the root causes of racial inequities in Oregon?

Leon – Oregon has a long and complicated history with racial inequities, dating back to early in our state’s history, including the inclusion of racist laws and policies. This legacy still exists today, both in the continued inequities faced by people of color, and in the lack of diversity in many areas of Oregon. When we as a state address issues of poverty and inequality, we need to do so with an equity lens in mind.

4. What is your response to comments that target and stereotype specific populations, such as immigrants and refugees to this country?

Leon – As the daughter of migrant farmworkers, I have seen firsthand what immigrants and refugees contribute to our state and country. I also see that many people who say divisive and negative things about immigrants and refugees are coming from a place of fear or concern about our economy. I think that as a state and as a country we need to reframe the conversation around what immigrants and refugees contribute to our economy, and our communities.

5. What solutions will you champion in response to the OHEA Mend the Gap Report highlighting the 383,000 uninsured Oregonians?  This includes COFA, immigrant, women and low-wage workers who face exclusions and barriers to healthcare.

Leon – Too many Oregonians go without health care because they are either uninsured or underinsured.  Any proposal aimed at making health care more affordable and accessible needs to keep in mind the barriers that so many Oregonians face in acquiring insurance, including their immigration or socioeconomic status. I believe that we need to look at solutions that will expand access to aid programs or insurance to the hundreds of thousands of Oregonians who are currently uninsured – either through state based programs or partnerships with local nonprofits who aim to provide access to health care to the underserved in their communities. I am committed to finding ways to make health care more accessible, and I look forward to working with a broad range of health advocates so that we find an approach that works for the most people.

6. What are your solutions to the Housing Crisis facing Oregonians?

Leon – As a Woodburn City Councilor, and as a current candidate, increasing access to affordable housing in our communities is something that I hear about frequently. During my time on the council I voted in favor of selling city property to a non-profit to build affordable housing units for low income families in Woodburn. I believe that the housing crisis being experienced all across this state needs both large solutions and locally focused efforts to ensure that all Oregonians can live in safety and with dignity.

7. What ideas do you have for improving curriculum to prepare our K-12 students to be business, political and social leaders in a racially and culturally diverse state?

Leon – First, I want to acknowledge that our education system is woefully underfunded. We need to reinvest in our schools so that we can lower our class sizes, restore vital programs like career technical education, and increase our graduation rates. I also believe that when we are hiring teachers and leaders in our schools we need to make sure that they are reflective of the diversity of the communities that they are serving. Our students of color need to see people who look like them and have similar backgrounds reflected in the people that they learn from and look up to in our education systems. We also need to be engaging our students at a young age to get them involved with our political leaders through civic education in our high schools.

For more information on these candidates, please visit their website:

Teresa Alonso Leon: electalonsoleon.com



 State Senator District 25

Laurie Monnes Anderson: www.lauriemonnesanderson.com

1. What racial/cultural/ethnic identities do you claim?

Anderson I am white, Caucasian with immigrant grandparents from Norway and Germany.

2. There are over 800,000 People of Color in Oregon, and growing.  Generations of racial exclusion, exploitation and divestment have historically marginalized communities of color from the political process.  What steps will you take to engage communities of color?

Anderson I have worked my entire career to serve people of color. I visited their homes as a nurse, helped them access resources, and was an advocate when needed. I have worked within my church in Rockwood to support communities of color who regularly use our facilities. We hope to offer a nonreligious, early child development daycare in the future. I will continue to support leaders of color in my community in taking on leadership roles.

3. What are the root causes of racial inequities in Oregon?

Anderson Root causes of racial inequities exist due primarily to lack of knowledge of cultural differences, customs/traditions, health disparities (research is usually being done on white males or females), poverty, and basic personal and institutional discrimination.  

4. What is your response to comments that target and stereotype specific populations, such as immigrants and refugees to this country?

Anderson Any action that targets or stereotypes specific populations is unethical and immoral.  I will always work to challenge stereotypes against communities like immigrants and refugees.

5. What solutions will you champion in response to the OHEA Mend the Gap Report highlighting the 383,000 uninsured Oregonians?  This includes COFA, immigrant, women and low-wage workers who face exclusions and barriers to healthcare.

Anderson As chair of the Senate Health Care committee, I will do all in my power to push for legislation that will insure all Oregonians like COFA and Cover All Kids.

6. What are your solutions to the Housing Crisis facing Oregonians?

Anderson There is a Metro-wide coalition working on the housing crisis and I look forward to the proposals they will bring to the Legislature.  I have voted for all changes that the Legislature passed in 2015 and 2016 to address the housing crisis, such as inclusionary zoning and banning rent increases in the first year of month-to-month tenancies.

7. What ideas do you have for improving curriculum to prepare our K-12 students to be business, political and social leaders in a racially and culturally diverse state?

Anderson To improve curriculum and prepare our K-12 students to be business, political and social leaders in a racially and culturally diverse state, I support incentives for businesses to hire a more diverse workforce.  I advocate for people of color to run for office and participate in everything from budget committees to neighborhood associations.   I have endorsed people of color and given to their campaigns.   I advocate for all children to learn about many different cultures and support mentoring for children who face language barriers in schools.

For more information on these candidates, please visit their website:

Laurie Monnes Anderson: www.lauriemonnesanderson.com

To get involved in APANO’s civic engagement work, please contact Kathy@apano.org or call 971-340-4861.

By | 2016-11-18T23:23:33+00:00 October 12th, 2016|Elections, News & Events|