We extend our warmest gratitude to all of our endorsed candidates! This was a meaningful Special Election for communities in Oregon, especially as schools and public services begin to reopen. Our community’s needs are in transition, as is our community leadership–but we know that each and every one of you are up to the task. No matter the results, you showed up for our youth and communities. You did not go unnoticed.

Congratulations to the following candidates:

Hoa Nguyen, David Douglas School District

Karen Perez-Da Silva, Beaverton School District

Kathy Wai North Clackamas School District

Ugonna Enyinnaya, Beaverton SChool District

Neelam Gupta, Lake Oswego School District

Stephanie D. Stephens, David Douglas School District

Andrea Valderrama, David Douglas School District

Mohamed Alyajouri, Portland Community COllege

Felicita Monteblanco, Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation District

Karina Guzman Ortiz, Salem Keizer School District

Osvaldo Avila, Salem Keizer School District

Maria Hinojos-Pressey, Salem Keizer School District

Cayle Tern, Reynolds School District

Michael Reyes, Reynolds School District

Helen Ying, Multnomah Education Services District

Andrea Valderrama, David Douglas School District

 

And additional “thank you” to these candidates for running:

Amanda Squiemphen-Yazzie, Multnomah Education Services District

Robyn Stowers, Gresham Barlow School District

Reiko Williams, Portland Community College

 

We want to also acknowledge the historic elections of Karina Ortiz for Salem Keizer School Board, for being the first Latina woman elected to this position, and to the Reynolds School Board, for having its first ever all BIPOC elected to the entire board. Cayle Tern for Reynolds School District, as the first Iu Mien board member. Hoa Nguyen, as David Douglas School District’s first Vietnamese board member. Ugonna Enyinnaya, as Beaverton School District’s first Nigerian board member.

An additional “thank you” to all of the volunteers, organizers, and field managers, who ran amazing campaigns. worked tirelessly and quickly to give our candidates the most support possible. Thank you all for your work!

Moving forward, let us not forget that our communities are the makers of history. That our communities are the real power changers. Whether it was with your ballot or your time, each of us played a role to make these historic wins happen. As we close Asian & Pacific Islander Heritage Month, these wins are part of our national story as Asians and Asian-Americans: we can make waves and we have always done so. We want to uplift these victories that honor and center everyone in this community, especially BIPOC as a whole. Our collective victories have the power to benefit and empower everyone, and they deserve to be celebrated with compassion for one another’s struggle, arm in arm.

So what next? How do we continue to build community power beyond an election? 

Use Solidarity Stories as a learning tool for your workplaces, classrooms, and affinity groups. Start conversations about API change makers, and learn how to build genuine solidarity among other BIPOC communities. 

Our power to create change is still growing, and there is still plenty for us to do. Take action with us. Hold our newly elected officials accountable. Tell us what’s impacting your community. Share your story. 

Become a volunteer at APANO and take up advocacy that matters to you. Contact Sophia Vicencio at sophia@apano.org to connect on leadership and civic engagement opportunities. Let’s build on this moment of community power and continue to make waves in our community month after month.

Let’s ensure every election, every legislative action, and every self care moment after #APAHM2021 counts towards our collective liberation. 

 

Thank you all!!

 

This programming message brought to you by APANO, a 501(c)4 nonprofit organization.